Double the Abundance

Today 26 – 01 – 2015 is an 8 day which is also the number for the year.  So brace yourselves, its double everything.

iTongo Tarot CardKey words and concept for 8 Justice – Balance; Justice; Realignment; Equilibrium; Logic and reason.

StrengthFor those of you who follow Waite 8 is Strength – Strength; Passion; Creative energy; Taming of the beast within; Courage; Moral victory.

Need for clarity of mind, impartial judgment and a balanced intellect.

Justice is about The mediator, adjuster, arbitrator. — One who has a deep love for simplicity, clarity, fairness and balance. So today especially for Libra, be aware of your centre and stay grounded because balance is needed.  If you haven’t set your resolutions yet, this is a good time to start that diet, balance your cheque book, tidy up your life, let go …

8 Justice is also about Karma.  You may have noticed changes on a spiritual level, these energies are adjusting your cycles which will lead towards balance and harmony.  Expect some profound moments and clarity and better sense of equilibrium.  Embrace the laws of cause and effect.  Embrace logic and fairness – a sense of judgement will prevail.

If you are dealing with any legal issues this card is a positive sign.  Things will go well this week. Also a good week to sign contracts or enter into agreements with others. If you are hesitant seek sound advice and keep your cool. Its best not to be ruled by emotions at this time – apply your intellect and logic.

If you missed “The Year Ahead” here is the link http://wp.me/p25KRU-df

iTongo Tarot Legends
As with most of the other tribes of South Africa, the Venda (VhaVenda) came from the Great Lakes of Central Africa. The Venda people are one of the last groups to have entered the area south of the Limpopo River. They first settled in the Soutpansberg Mountains.

The Venda language, TshiVenda or LuVenda, emerged as a distinct dialect in the 16th Century. In the 20th Century, the TshiVenda vocabulary was similar to SeSotho, but the grammar shares similarities with Shona dialects, spoken in Zimbabwe.

Venda law and custom constituted a system designed to protect firstly family rights, then the chiefdom and finally the individual. This placed the onus on the individual and the realisation that his actions affected the greater community, especially his/her descent group.

Venda culture has a strong emphasis on male authority (patrilineal). Moral behaviour is essentially the right and good actions of the man who does not upset the balance and harmony between the clan, society, and nature. Nature and man work together in harmony as the actions of one has consequences on the other.

The good man was not only one who respected seniors and was loyal to his family, he was also a good neighbour1. He was to live with generosity of heart and possessions and be free of the suspicion of witchcraft. He needed to be meticulous in observance of custom and loyal to the chief.

The formal handling of disputes began with the local headman and ended with the chief at the capital. A panel of elders assisted the chief and would advise on points of law and provide continuity of experience.

The process of bringing a case to court was simple and logical. If one felt that his rights had been violated, he would report the matter to his immediate headman. A date was set for the hearing and all parties concerned instructed to attend with any relevant witnesses. The case was heard in the men’s meeting place, which was a prominent feature of the homestead of chief or headman. Women were not permitted to attend these proceedings, unless they were directly involved in the case. Witnesses were allowed to hear all the testimonies and were often allowed to modify their own. In a case of civil wrong, the judgement would be restitution and compensation – the intention to ‘right a wrong’, i.e. stolen goods to be returned, the trespasser removed, or unfulfilled contracts honoured. In the case of damage or actions, which could not be undone, compensation was awarded and was usually paid for in livestock. Failing the ownership or possession of livestock, the complainant was entitled to exact satisfaction and take what he could.

Criminal offences were homicide, grievous assault, rape, incest, crimes against the chiefdom’s authorities and witchcraft/sorcery.

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