Perspective is Everything


Zwidudwane12 The Hanged Man – ZWIDUDWANE

Radical change of perspective /Time in suspension /Humour as a tool /Self-imposed limitations /Spiritual turning point /Effective timing /Challenges are teachers /True light and rebirth /Transcend ego

What patterns do you keep repeating? How do you limit yourself? What do you expect from the sacrifices you are making?

The Hanged Man card is often misinterpreted due to the name and visual. In iTongo I honour the Venda’s great python God of Fertility.  Fertility is the capability or capacity to grow, develop or produce.  This ties in with 1+2=3 which is the Empress who is all about growth and abundance. As we are in the year of the Lovers (6) and this week we need to look at our relationships from a different angle.  We need to change our perspective of where we are and where we want to be.  This applies to all our relationships.  Do our current relationships help with our personal growth, or are these relationships toxic and limiting.  Being fertile is also about the ability to imagine, to be creative in our thoughts and our actions.  We need to be more giving and willing rather than expecting what we believe will make us happy.  The more we give the more we receive.

The Python is entwined on a branch from the Tree of life.  The concept of the tree of life is about knowledge which connects us to heaven and uniting the three worlds of above, below and us.  It’s also a metaphor for our life and our connection to the Ancestors.  The Ancestors will guide you to your own turning point which brings about a new level of understanding.  Like many trees that are bare in winter we learn that time is suspended but history teaches us that in the spring all is renewed.  This week we may feel like we are running on the spot without achieving anything – just be patient and wait for the turn, for the spring to arrive with new promises and a new way of being. Challenges are our teachers.  How we face them and how we resolve them teaches us valuable lessons.  Some keep repeating the same mistakes (and often expect a different outcome).  This week is ideal to change the way you do things.  As you change so too shall the result change.  Don’t hold onto ideals because of ego – let go and allow the universe and the Ancestors to guide you towards your spiritual awakening.  When spirit is at peace everything else in our lives follows suit.

The Hanged Man comes up when we are at a crossroads.  We have to make a choice, it is a clear sign the ‘something’ has to change.  Stop, take note, breathe and take control. As far as relationships go, ask yourself are you and your partner on the same page.  Do you both want the same things out of life and the relationship. Some relationships have their ‘sell by date’, they are not designed to last a lifetime.  Yet we often expect a short term liaison to last way beyond its capacity.  We then spend years trying to manipulate and fix what no longer has vitality and life.  Recognise that you need to move on.  Are you being too idealistic about romance – are your expectations within the relationship unrealistic?  Are you a 6 wanting a 10?  What do you offer?  What is your Unique Selling Point?

The Hanged Man also asks us to be generous and to share what we have.  Remember there is always someone worse off than you. Give what ever you have and that will open the flow of abundance.  The basic laws of attraction. What you put out will return.  Let go of negative thought patterns and visualise new and exciting outcomes.  Sometimes the best action is to do nothing.  Look at life from a different angle.  All good things come to those who wait.

“Change the way you look at things and the things you look at change.” 
― Wayne W. Dyer

 iTongo Legend – The Python God

The python is the god of fertility in Venda culture and lives beneath the waters of Lake Fundudzi. According to legend, a beautiful creature with curious patterned skin lived on land and he married two human wives, one old and one young. Each night when darkness came, he would go to their huts and stay until dawn. The wives never saw their husband in daylight. The young wife became curious and puzzled by this, and one day her curiosity got the better of her. She crept back from the fields and peeped in at the window. There she discovered that her husband was a fat and good natured python. Horrified at her discovery, she fled and he, in his sorrow and mortification, walked into Lake Fundudzi and disappeared forever beneath the surface.

From then on famine and drought was all over the land. The rivers and pools dried up, not even sundown could bring respite during the hot airless nights. No dew fell and even the birds fell from the sky from dehydration.

The elders and chiefs held many indabas (meetings) but no one knew or could understand the cause of this disaster. After a time the young wife stepped forward and confessed what she had done. The people begged her to make amends and placate her offended husband, thereby restoring fertility to the land.

One morning she was escorted down to the lake by all the men, blowing their reed flutes in honour of her courage. At the water’s edge, the chief presented her with a calabash of the finest beer. She waded slowly out into the water with the vessel in her hands, going deeper and deeper, until the dark water closed over her head and she was gone forever. With the Python God placated, bountiful harvests returned to the fields and pastures.

To this day, the people of the district go down to the lake with the chief. A member of his lineage walks out into the lake carrying a pot of beer, which he carefully pours on to the water. If the beer sinks, it is an indication of the python god of fertility’s pleasure and acceptance. If it floats, it means rejection and displeasure, and he will try to pull the supplicant below the water. To guard against this possibility, a strong rope is fastened around the pourer’s waist so that he can be pulled back quickly just in case the offerings are rejected.

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One comment on “Perspective is Everything

  1. Pingback: Year of the Snake in iTongo Tarot | africantarot

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