Listen to Intuition


The High Priestess - Moyo2 The High Priestess

MOYÔ

CONCEPT Intuition; Self-resourcefulness; Dissolving barriers; The Oracle; Releasing boundaries

Moyô invites you to heal through nature.

The universal mother /Seeking esoteric knowledge /Secrets revealed through dreams /Abundant potential /Finding balance through intuition & insight /Increase self-esteem /Common sense /Value your independence /Excellent negotiator /Democracy

Discovering and learning to work with our intuition is often avoided as we fear the ‘energies’ we may be attracting.  Within each of us we have that still point, that place where we have absolute truth.  We all have experienced intuition and inspiration, through working with our inner knowing we are able to access the power within.

The simplest is working with our dreams.  We all dream, it’s a question of remembering and interpreting those dreams.  I believe that our dream world is the ‘interpreter’ between our unconscious and conscious minds.  That is why we dream in symbols.  Some dreams are about us downloading the day and have no significance other than to make space for new thoughts and ideas.  Some dreams allow us the opportunity to work through our issues and situations without actually having to go through them. And some dreams are communications from our inner selves – these are the dreams we need to take note of for our growth and understanding.

The High Priestess is a spiritual card, so this week we are asked to find our balance through the connections of intuition and insight. This week its OK to rely on your ‘gut feelings’ – trust that what you believe you know, is correct.  More often than not we second guess that little voice inside, we make choices and decisions based on our intellect, and remember the brain always has an agenda, whereas our inner voice’s sole purpose is to protect us and keep us safe and on our paths of truth.

The High Priestess brings with her pleasant surprises and synchronicity.  All of a sudden, what we have been chasing/pursuing all comes together. Perhaps even new opportunities, life may just feel simpler, easier when the Priestess is in play.  There is also a sensual side to the Priestess, so those looking for love will find it in all the right places.

The lesson of this card is to begin consulting with your unconscious and learn to interpret through the subconscious so that you can live consciously each day.  Make the right choices and have the right responses.

Start a dream diary.  It doesn’t matter if you cant remember your dreams, start with just asking yourself “what am I feeling”? perhaps there is a residue of emotion, a sound or random visuals.  Over time you will begin to recognise your symbols and archetypes, you will develop a map with billboards that explain what you are thinking and feeling.

Another way is to sit quietly each day and meditate – remember meditation is a process not a destination, no need to push for some kind of ‘experience’, just allow the thoughts to arise, don’t get involved in the thoughts, take note and let them go.  Anything that has arisen make a note in your diary and look out for those thoughts in your dreams.

What I enjoy on The Taxi is the segment ‘Song in your Head’ this could also be an indication of messages from your unconscious.  Keep a note of the song, the lyric or even the tune.  Nothing is by accident, we are constantly being guided to acknowledge and act on our intuition.

The High Priestess is about serenity, knowledge and understanding.  She is the guardian to our inner world and lifts the veil of awareness to show us our true selves.  She guides us to enlightenment and divine knowledge.  This week listen to and trust your inner voice.

iTongo Legend

The majestic Baobab tree is revered in African culture and is the undisputed monarch of the savannah trees of Africa. In ancient times, kings, elders, and leaders from the Limpopo region would meet under giant Baobabs to discuss matters of great importance. Not only did these trees provide shelter and sustenance, but tribal leaders also believed that the spirit of the Baobab (oracle*) would always guide them to make wise decisions.

Many myths and folklore are associated with the Baobab. The San believed that the Baobab had offended God and, in revenge, God planted the tree upside down. The San believed that any person who plucked the flowers would be torn apart by lions, as punishment for disturbing the spirits in the flowers. It is also believed that after soaking the pips in water, the drinker will be mighty and protected from crocodiles.

Almost every part of the tree is useful to man. A single Baobab may hold as much as four- and-a-half thousand litres of water. Their white flowers are large and sweet smelling, often likened to the stars of the evening sky as they only bloom at night. The pollen of the flowers yields an excellent glue, and the seeds are pleasant to suck (rich in protein, calcium, oil and phosphates), or they can be ground and roasted to make a coffee.

The fruit pod contains tartaric acid (which is used in sherbet) and is often called the ‘cream of tartar’ tree. Elephants, monkeys, and baboons depend on its fruit (the vitamin C content of one fruit is equivalent to four oranges). A white pulp, inside the seed pods, when mixed with water, is used to treat malaria. Young leaves have high calcium content and can be used as a kind of spinach. The spongy wood is used to make ropes or paper.

Order of the Baobab

The Order of the Baobab represents exceptional contribution, and is awarded to South African citizens for distinguished service that goes beyond the call of duty in the following categories: struggle for democracy; building democracy and human rights; nation-building; peace and security; journalism, literature, arts, culture, sports and music; business and the economy; science, medicine and technological innovation; and community service. The Order of the Baobab is awarded in three classes: gold, silver, and bronze.

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